NPT Blog

Interesting information related to Neuropsychotherapy

Nutrition, Sleep & Mental Health

by Julia Rucklidge, PhD & Bonnie Kaplan, PhD The two of us have had the honour recently of co-editing a special series on Nutrition and Mental Health for the journal called Clinical Psychological Science (CPS), one of the flagship journals of the Association of...

Starvation: What Does it Do to the Brain?

by Bonnie Kaplan, PhD & Julia Rucklidge, PhD Before we start looking at current trials using nutrients to treat mental health outcomes, we thought we would revisit the past once more to see how knowledge gained by our predecessors may be helpful for our current...

Are Supplements Simply Creating Expensive Urine?

by Bonnie Kaplan, PhD & Julia Rucklidge, PhD Previously we have discussed research highlighting the role that dietary patterns may play in mental health outcomes, with some fairly convincing relationships across different studies and different countries showing...

Scared out of your mind: Halloween, fear and the brain

Larger than life or small time? Herval, CC BY Kira Shaw, University of Sheffield Children and adults alike are digging out those spooky costumes ready for a celebration. We’ve reached that time of year again: Halloween. October 31 is dedicated to remembering the dead....

Social Neuroscience & the Biopsychological Model

Social neuroscience has become a rapidly developing field aided by the wide spread use of imaging techniques. It has been noted that there is difficulty in determining the neurophysiological basis of the “social brain” since no brain structure or subpopulation of...

A dietary supplement dampens the brain hyperexcitability seen in seizures or epilepsy

Seizure disorders — including epilepsy — are associated with pathological hyperexcitability in brain neurons. Unfortunately, there are limited available treatments that can prevent this hyperexcitability. However, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found that inducing a biochemical alteration in brain proteins via the dietary supplement glucosamine was able to rapidly dampen that pathological hyperexcitability in rat and mouse models.