The Neuropsychotherapist Complete Archive

Magazine

Spotlight on Sherif Darwish

Introduction to Dr. Sherif Darwish by Richard Hill I first met Dr. Sherif Darwish at a conference in Switzerland, in 2010. We spoke about a difficult case and have continued our connection to this day. Dr. Darwish is based in Alexandria, Egypt. He is a champion for...

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Is Mindfulness Safe For Trauma Survivors?

Is Mindfulness Safe for Trauma Survivors? by David Treleaven   ver the past decade, I’ve researched the relationship between mindfulness meditation and trauma. Placed beside one another, mindfulness and...

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Seasonal Affective Disorder: SAD

Seasonal Affective Disorder: SAD Dr. Lori Ann Russell-Chapin in conversation with Richard Hill Members Download: Richard: Welcome Lori. First of all, tell me a little bit about yourself. Lori: I have a PhD in Counseling, and I’ve been teaching at...

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Neuroscience and Counselling

Members Download Article: The Remarkable and Mysterious Brain On a cold and wet winter morning, Bob overcomes his “excuses” and begins his daily run. As expected, the first few kilometres are gruelling and painful, but midway through the run,...

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Understanding PANS & PANDAS

Members Download Article: Insomnia, out-of-control tantrums, separation anxiety, rage, obsessions, disordered eating, paranoia, motor and vocal tics. As a therapist or parent, have you come across a child exhibiting any of these behaviours and...

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The New Mind-Body Science of Depression

Members Download Article: Charles Raison, MD, is the Mary Sue and Mike Shannon Chair for Healthy Minds, Children & Families and Professor in the School of Human Ecology and the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of...

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Prepared, Ready and Able

Members Download Article: You come home from a long day of work and as you wander past the kitchen you see the refrigerator and the next thing you know, you have opened the fridge door and you are extracting a selection of tasty treats. How did...

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Hilary Jacobs Hendel

Download Article: This month we put the spotlight on licensed clinical social worker and adult psychoanalyst, Hilary Jacobs Hendel. She has a Master of Social Work with Clinical Concentration from Fordham University and has completed the 4-year...

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What is PANDAS/PANS?

Members Download full article  When my middle son, Sammy, was twelve years old he was suddenly struck with an increasingly bizarre series of behaviors, just before the start of sixth grade. He was diagnosed first with obsessive-compulsive...

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October Issue Correction

Our apologies to Paul Potgieter and Thedy Veliz - in our recent October issue we put Thedy's bio in with Paul's outline of his presentation for the upcoming neuropsychotherapy conference. Our deepest apologies for the mix up. Here attached is the corrected pages, and...

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The Neurobiology of Feeling Safe

Members Download: THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS: REFLECTIONS OF THE BRAIN AND BODY The important role of “safety” in our life is so intuitive and so relevant that it is surprising that our institutions neglect it. Perhaps our misunderstanding of the role...

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Evolutionary Perspectives

Evolutionary Perspectives: Attachment Theory, Affect Regulation Theory and Working With Relational Trauma Haley Peckham Subscribers Download The Full Article Here  A famous quote from Anaïs Nin asserts that “We don’t see things as they are, we see...

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Eating for Mental Wellbeing

Report by Binh Nguyen Members Download How often have we heard the saying that we are what we eat, with the view that the foods we eat can directly influence our state of mind and physical health? This statement may well be true for the more...

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The Story of You

Members Download There is so much I want to say and share about the importance of having a coherent narrative, and how one achieves that. Sometimes I think its simpler and clearer to talk about it in educational rather than psychological terms…in...

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Maria Kostyanaya

Download article aria Kostyanaya is a provisionally registered psychologist currently working for Queensland Corrective Services in Brisbane and at the Queensland Psychology Clinic in...

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A Brief Review of the Best Apps

Members Download:  martphone technology has been increasingly used in the medical field and is currently rising in the field of behavioral health. Some behavioral health interventions...

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The Art of the Brain

Members Download:  y nontraditional path to art through a doctorate in neuroscience arms me with an outsider’s perspective and gives me the freedom to introduce imagery and concepts...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 6

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 6 (June 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As the psalmist once said, we are “fearfully and wonderfully made”. How true that is when we consider the immense complexity of the brain—and its...

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Ken Benau

Download Article: Ken Benau, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with 27 years’ experience. He has a private practice in psychotherapy, consultation and training in Kensington, CA, located in the San Francisco Bay area. For many years, Ken...

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Work Stressed and Play?

Work Stressed and Play? A brief look at competitive gaming Members Download the Article here: To date, competitive gaming has not been widely researched or recognised in the scientific and professional literature on video games. As the name...

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The Neuroscience of War

Download Article: As the Middle East rages with war and terrorism, one can only be awed by the magnitude of the conflict,  the degree of the calamity that is taking place there, and its effect on the children. Millions of children in the region...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Issue 5 Volume 5

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 5 (May 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content It is no secret that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a major mental health concern today. Prevalence appears to have risen sharply...

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Dan Siegel

Download Article Dr. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA. He is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute, an...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 4

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 4 (April 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As therapists, we formulate hypotheses about our clients and their states of mind from a psychological perspective. We may utilise talk therapy,...

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Departments

Could a Protein Called Klotho Block Dementia and Aging?

Neurologist and neuroscientist Dena Dubal, MD, PhD, is taking an innovative approach to battling neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Rather than trying to understand the specific mechanisms that cause each disease, she took a step back and asked, “What do all these conditions have in common?”

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Body clock disruptions occur years before memory loss in Alzheimer’s

People with Alzheimer’s disease have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of Alzheimer’s.

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Language is Learned In Brain Circuits That Predate Humans

It has often been claimed that humans learn language using brain components that are specifically dedicated to this purpose. Now, new evidence strongly suggests that language is in fact learned in brain systems that are also used for many other purposes and even pre-existed humans.

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Cognitive neuroscience: the awareness of ignorance

Metacognitive judgments on non-experienced events are processed in the frontopolar cortex of the brain, whereas metacognition on experienced events is associated with the dorsal prefrontal cortex, as reported in a study on non-human primates just published in Neuron.

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When the Eyes Move, the Eardrums Move Too

Simply moving the eyes triggers the eardrums to move too, says a new study by Duke University neuroscientists. The researchers found that keeping the head still but shifting the eyes to one side or the other sparks vibrations in the eardrums, even in the absence of any sounds.

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Modern human brain organization emerged only recently

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reveal how and when the typical globular brain shape of modern humans evolved. Their analyses based on changes in endocranial size and shape in Homo sapiens fossils show that brain organization, and possibly brain function, evolved gradually within our species and unexpectedly reached modern conditions only recently.

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Energy Drink Use in Teens has Adverse Effects

New research from Chapman University evaluates frequency and reasons for use. A Chapman University faculty member has published new research showing why many teenagers consume energy drinks, how often, the age they started and what influences their choice of brands.

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Deaf children learn words faster than hearing children

According to estimates by the Robert Koch Institute, up to two thousand hearing impaired children are born in Germany each year. For some of them a cochlear implant can offer relief. Until now, it was not clear which processes take place in the affected children when they start to learn language later than their contemporaries with normal hearing—and why they differ in their success to reach a normal level of language.

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A new therapeutic avenue for Parkinson’s disease

Clearing senescent astrocytes prevents Parkinson’s in mouse model of sporadic disease. Systemic clearing of senescent astrocytes prevents Parkinson’s neuropathology and associated symptoms in a mouse model of sporadic disease, the type implicated in 95% of human cases.

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‘Depression Education’ Effective For Some Teens

In an assessment of their “depression literacy” program, which has already been taught to tens of thousands, Johns Hopkins researchers say the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) achieved its intended effect of encouraging many teenagers to speak up and seek adult help for themselves or a peer.

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Curcumin improves memory and mood, new UCLA study says

Lovers of Indian food, give yourselves a second helping: Daily consumption of a certain form of curcumin — the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color — improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss, according to the results of a study conducted by UCLA researchers.

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The Ins and Outs of Area 25

Neuroscientists have charted the incoming and outgoing connections of a brain region located deep within the primate prefrontal cortex that has important roles in emotion and memory processes. The comprehensive, high-resolution map reported in JNeurosci provides new insight into how emotional regulation may become disrupted in psychiatric disorders.

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From Healthcare to Warfare: How to Regulate Brain Technology

Ethicists from the University of Basel have outlined a new biosecurity framework specific to neurotechnology. While the researchers declare an outright ban of dual-use technology ethically unjustified, they call for regulations aimed at protecting the mental privacy and integrity of humans. The journal Neuron has published the study.

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What are chronophilias?

Some people have unusual attractions to specific age groups. Varshesh Joshi on Unsplash, CC BY Michael Seto, University of Toronto Mr. Smith was a 27-year-old man referred for psychological treatment after sexually offending against a 13-year-old boy. He initially...

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Study: Hits, Not Concussions, Cause CTE

Researchers have identified evidence of early Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) brain pathology after head impact—even in the absence of signs of concussion. Early indicators of CTE pathology not only persisted long after injury but also spread through the brain, providing the best evidence to date that head impact, not concussion, causes CTE.

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Dietary Patterns and Mental Health

by Bonnie Kaplan, PhD & Julia Rucklidge, PhD We are constantly hearing that ‘how we eat’ affects our health. There are several ways in which ‘how we eat’ can be quantified, but today we would like to focus on one: Dietary Patterns. First we want to say what research...

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Spotlight on Sherif Darwish

Introduction to Dr. Sherif Darwish by Richard Hill I first met Dr. Sherif Darwish at a conference in Switzerland, in 2010. We spoke about a difficult case and have continued our connection to this day. Dr. Darwish is based in Alexandria, Egypt. He is a champion for...

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Are We at a Tipping Point?

by Bonnie Kaplan, PhD & Julia Rucklidge, PhD A few years ago, the Huffington Post  published an article: “Diet may be as important to mental health as it is to physical health.”  This comes on the heels of an opinion piece written by the executive of ISNPR...

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Nutrient Boosting of Medications

by Bonnie Kaplan, PhD & Julia Rucklidge, PhD Bonnie remembers seeing an issue of the Harvard Mental Health Letter dated October 2008 entitled “Herbal and dietary supplements for depression” [www.health.harvard.edu) and thinking ‘at last, people are beginning to accept...

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