This week Dr. Dave talks his latest podcast #433 – Transactional Analysis: Past, Present, and Future with Vann Joines PhD

You can find the full podcast at #433 – Transactional Analysis: Past, Present, and Future with Vann Joines PhD

Vann S. Joines, Ph.D. is a licensed Clinical Psychologist, licensed Marital and Family Therapist, and President and Director of the Southeast Institute for Group and Family Therapy, Chapel Hill, NC. He is also a Certified Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst and the 1994 Winner of the Eric Berne Memorial Award for the Integration of TA with Other Approaches. He is a Diplomate and Founding Member of the Redecision Therapy Association, a Certified Group Psychotherapist, a Certified Practitioner, Teacher and Supervisor in Advanced Integrative Therapy, an Approved Supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, a Life Fellow of the American Group Psychotherapy Association and the Vice President for Professional Standards of the International Transactional Analysis Association. He is co-author of TA Today: A New Introduction to Transactional Analysis, 2nd Edition (2012) and Personality Adaptations: A New Guide to Human Understanding in Psychotherapy and Counseling (2002) and author of the Joines Personality Adaptation Questionnaire and JPAQ Administrative, Scoring, and Interpretive Kit (2002).


Also…

Obese Children’s Brains More Responsive to Sugar

 

A new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine finds that the brains of obese children literally light up differently when tasting sugar.

Published online in International Journal of Obesity, the study does not show a causal relationship between sugar hypersensitivity and overeating but it does support the idea that the growing number of America’s obese youth may have a heightened psychological reward response to food.

This elevated sense of “food reward” – which involves being motivated by food and deriving a good feeling from it – could mean some children have brain circuitries that predispose them to crave more sugar throughout life.

“The take-home message is that obese children, compared to healthy weight children, have enhanced responses in their brain to sugar,” said first author Kerri Boutelle, PhD, professor in the Department of Psychiatry and founder of the university’s Center for Health Eating and Activity Research (CHEAR).

Source: UCSD News


University of Michigan study pinpoints part of brain that triggers addiction

 

Activating the brain’s amygdala, an almond-shaped mass that processes emotions, can create an addictive, intense desire for sugary foods, a new U-M study found.

Rewards such as sweet, tasty food or even addictive drugs like alcohol or cocaine can be extremely attractive when this brain structure is triggered.

“One reason they can be so problematic for certain individuals is their ability to become almost the sole focus of their daily lives, at the cost of one’s health, job, family and general well-being,” said the study’s lead author, Mike Robinson, a former postdoctoral U-M fellow and currently an assistant professor of psychology at Wesleyan University in Connecticut.

Source: Michigan News

Brain Inflammation A Hallmark Of Autism, Large-Scale Analysis Shows

While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains reveals. The study, a collaborative effort between Johns Hopkins and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, included data from 72 autism and control brains.

“There are many different ways of getting autism, but we found that they all have the same downstream effect,” says Dan Arking, Ph.D., an associate professor in the McKusick-Nathans Institute for Genetic Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “What we don’t know is whether this immune response is making things better in the short term and worse in the long term.”

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine

 


Are you genetically predisposed to antisocial behaviour?

Both positive and negative experiences influence how genetic variants affect the brain and thereby behaviour, according to a new study. “Evidence is accumulating to show that the effects of variants of many genes that are common in the population depend on environmental factors. Further, these genetic variants affect each other,” explained Sheilagh Hodgins of the University of Montreal and its affiliated Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal. “We conducted a study to determine whether juvenile offending was associated with interactions between three common genetic variants and positive and negative experiences.” Hodgins and her colleagues published the study on December 11, 2014 in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Source: Université de Montréal


support
Need Help?
Support Ticket
Skip to toolbar