Progressive Counting Facilitates Memory Reconsolidation

Kymberly A. Lasser & Ricky Greenwald

 

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Subscribers Download Article:  Progressive Counting Facilitates Memory Reconsolidation

Memory reconsolidation is a central element of certain psychotherapy approaches. Progressive counting (PC) is a recently developed trauma treatment that has performed at least as well as eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in two comparisons. Presented here is a case study of PC, as used within a phase model of trauma-informed treatment, to illustrate how it facilitates memory reconsolidation.

 

Kymberly Lasser, MA, is a program developer, researcher, and trauma therapist at the Trauma Institute & Child Trauma Institute in Northampton, Massachusetts. She provides intensive trauma therapy retreats for children, pre/adolescents, teens, adults, families, and couples. She utilises a trauma informed approach known as The Fairy Tale Model.

Ricky Greenwald, PsyD, is the founder and executive director of Trauma Institute & Child Trauma Institute. He was previously on the faculty of the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, is an Affiliate Professor at the SUNY Buffalo School of Social Work, and is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. He is the author of numerous professional articles as well as several books. His work has been translated into over a dozen languages. Dr. Greenwald developed many techniques used by EMDR child therapists, and his comprehensive EMDR training model has been emulated internationally. He also developed the MASTR protocol for treating problem behaviors, Progressive Counting, and the Fairy Tale phase model of trauma treatment.


Special Memory Reconsolidation Issue of The Neuropsychotherapist

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UNDERSTANDING MEMORY RECONSOLIDATION 
Bruce Ecker corrects some of the most common misconceptions about memory reconsolidation and its application in clinical practice.
Bruce Ecker

DEEP RELEASE FOR BODY AND SOUL: MEMORY RECONSOLIDATION AND THE ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE
A vivid case study illustrating the memory reconsolidation process in action with the Alexander Technique.
Robin Ticic and Elise Kushner

PROGRESSIVE COUNTING FACILITATES MEMORY RECONSOLIDATION
Progressive counting is a recently developed trauma treatment technique that facilitates memory reconsolidation. Kymberly Lasser and Ricky Greenwald take us through the process using a case example.
Kymberly Lasser & Ricky Greenwald

HOW ENERGY PSYCHOLOGY CHANGES DEEP EMOTIONAL LEARNINGS
Energy psychology is a technique of tapping acupuncture points while exploring distressing memories. David Feinstein explains how this somatic intervention capitalises on memory reconsolidation to resolve traumatic memories
David Feinstein

MEMORY RECONSOLIDATION IN NLP
Bruce Ecker describes how the therapeutic reconsolidation process can be utilised for consistently effective psychotherapy across a range of modalities. Here Bruce looks at a case example using neuro-linguistic programming.
Bruce Ecker

 


Adobe Photoshop PDFHard copy book now available from Amazon.com:

Memory reconsolidation (MR)—a foundational process with the potential, if properly understood, to consistently bring about the kind of transformational change that we look for in the lives of clients—is the subject of this book. Featured in this issue is Bruce Ecker, one of the foremost experts in applying techniques that fulfil the neurobiological requirements to achieve MR in clinical practice. In fact all of the authors in this issue are experts in their respective fields, demonstrating the unifying nature of MR in such diverse therapies as the Alexander technique, energy psychology, neuro-linguistic programming, and progressive counting. Understanding the biological basis of our memory and how it can be modified is the key to effective therapeutic change, especially when emotional memories are driving unwanted symptoms. The content of this special issue has been previously published in The Neuropsychotherapist or the International Journal of Neuropsychotherapy.

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