The Neuropsychotherapist Complete Archive

Magazine

October Issue Correction

Our apologies to Paul Potgieter and Thedy Veliz - in our recent October issue we put Thedy's bio in with Paul's outline of his presentation for the upcoming neuropsychotherapy conference. Our deepest apologies for the mix up. Here attached is the corrected pages, and...

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The Neurobiology of Feeling Safe

Members Download: THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS: REFLECTIONS OF THE BRAIN AND BODY The important role of “safety” in our life is so intuitive and so relevant that it is surprising that our institutions neglect it. Perhaps our misunderstanding of the role...

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Evolutionary Perspectives

Evolutionary Perspectives: Attachment Theory, Affect Regulation Theory and Working With Relational Trauma Haley Peckham Subscribers Download The Full Article Here  A famous quote from Anaïs Nin asserts that “We don’t see things as they are, we see...

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Eating for Mental Wellbeing

Report by Binh Nguyen Members Download How often have we heard the saying that we are what we eat, with the view that the foods we eat can directly influence our state of mind and physical health? This statement may well be true for the more...

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The Story of You

Members Download There is so much I want to say and share about the importance of having a coherent narrative, and how one achieves that. Sometimes I think its simpler and clearer to talk about it in educational rather than psychological terms…in...

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Maria Kostyanaya

Download article aria Kostyanaya is a provisionally registered psychologist currently working for Queensland Corrective Services in Brisbane and at the Queensland Psychology Clinic in...

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A Brief Review of the Best Apps

Members Download:  martphone technology has been increasingly used in the medical field and is currently rising in the field of behavioral health. Some behavioral health interventions...

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The Art of the Brain

Members Download:  y nontraditional path to art through a doctorate in neuroscience arms me with an outsider’s perspective and gives me the freedom to introduce imagery and concepts...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 6

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 6 (June 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As the psalmist once said, we are “fearfully and wonderfully made”. How true that is when we consider the immense complexity of the brain—and...

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Ken Benau

Download Article: Ken Benau, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with 27 years’ experience. He has a private practice in psychotherapy, consultation and training in Kensington, CA, located in the San Francisco Bay area. For many years, Ken...

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Work Stressed and Play?

Work Stressed and Play? A brief look at competitive gaming Members Download the Article here: To date, competitive gaming has not been widely researched or recognised in the scientific and professional literature on video games. As the name...

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The Neuroscience of War

Download Article: As the Middle East rages with war and terrorism, one can only be awed by the magnitude of the conflict,  the degree of the calamity that is taking place there, and its effect on the children. Millions of children in the region...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Issue 5 Volume 5

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 5 (May 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content It is no secret that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a major mental health concern today. Prevalence appears to have risen...

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Dan Siegel

Download Article Dr. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA. He is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute, an...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 4

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 4 (April 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As therapists, we formulate hypotheses about our clients and their states of mind from a psychological perspective. We may utilise talk...

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Ann Diamond Weinstein

  Download Article: Ann Diamond Weinstein, PhD, holds a doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology. In her consultation practice she provides education and coaching to health and mental health practitioners,...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 3

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 3 (March 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content Most people who suffer trauma show evidence of a remarkable human capacity to overcome traumatic events, recovering to lead a normal life with...

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Narcissism – The Shame-Negating Personality

Download Article: Narcissism: The Shame-Negating Personality Mark Zaslav, PhD Psychiatric labels have long been criticized for bringing stigma to those afflicted with mental disorders. In the case of narcissistic personality disorder, one glance...

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This is Your Brain on Loneliness

Download: Valentine’s Day inundates us with images of romance, often leaving us feeling wistful or lonely, as our own lives—whether single or coupled—seldom seem as rich or passionate as the ones on TV. For some, this is a passing melancholy; but...

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Guide To The Brain Part 13 – Depression

Members Download: What Is Depression? Depression comes under the umbrella of mood or affective disorders, in which individuals have difficulty controlling mood states. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, (5th ed.; DSM–5;...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 2

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 2 (February 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As psychotherapists, we often deal with clients who are experiencing or have experienced domestic violence—both victims and perpetrators....

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The Fear of New Technology

Members Download: In 16th-century Europe, a strange new psychiatric disorder emerged: people started to believe that they were made of glass. A famous early sufferer of the “glass delusion” was King Charles VI of France who, following a series of...

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Kitchen Garden Programs and Changing Brains

Members Download: Neuroscience research advocates the necessity of children spending time away from artificial light and outdoors, stating fresh air and sunshine are vital elements to enhance brain development and help balance brain functions...

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Departments

Learning and staying in shape key to longer lifespan

People who are overweight cut their life expectancy by two months for every extra kilogramme of weight they carry, research suggests. A major study of the genes that underpin longevity has also found that education leads to a longer life, with almost a year added for each year spent studying beyond school. Other key findings are that people who give up smoking, study for longer and are open to new experiences might expect to live longer.

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Brain waves reflect different types of learning

Researchers have, for the first time, identified neural signatures of explicit and implicit learning. Figuring out how to pedal a bike and memorizing the rules of chess require two different types of learning, and now for the first time, researchers have been able to distinguish each type of learning by the brain-wave patterns it produces.

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Life in the city: Living near a forest keeps your amygdala healthier

MRI study analyzes stress-processing brain regions in older city dwellers. A study conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has investigated the relationship between the availability of nature near city dwellers’ homes and their brain health. Its findings are relevant for urban planners among others.

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The female brain reacts more strongly to prosocial behavior

Behavioral Experiments show that women are more generous than men. Now, researchers at the UZH have been able to demonstrate that female and male brains process prosocial and selfish behavior differently. For women, prosocial behavior triggers a stronger reward signal, while male reward systems respond more strongly to selfish behavior.

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Clinical Biopsychological Approach

The Clinical Biopsychological Approach has its neurophysiological and neuropsychological bases in the Dimensional Systems Model of higher cognitive functioning. It represents a brain-based psychotherapy integration approach that explains the impact of...

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Less stress, more social competence

Adults too can acquire social skills such as empathy and compassion. The human brain is able to change and adapt to new conditions throughout life. Scientists refer to this capacity as plasticity. Until recently, it was unclear to what extent areas of the brain that control social behavior also possess this ability.

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Brain wiring affects how people perform specific tasks

The way a person’s brain is “wired” directly impacts how well they perform simple and complex tasks, according to a new study from researchers at Rice University. DescriptionThe brain is organized into different subnetworks, or “modules,” that support distinct functions for different tasks, such as speaking, memorizing and expressing emotion.

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Combination treatment targeting glucose in advanced brain cancer shows promising results in preclinical study

UCLA scientists have discovered a potential combination treatment for glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer in adults. The three-year study led by David Nathanson, a member of UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, found that the drug combination tested in mice disrupts and exploits glucose intake, essentially cutting off the tumor’s nutrients and energy supply.

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Alzheimer’s gene poses both risk — and benefits

Study suggests role of inflammation in brain disease is complicated. Scientists drilling down to the molecular roots of Alzheimer’s disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. A major player is a gene called TREM2, mutations of which can substantially raise a person’s risk of the disease. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the immune system’s ability to protect the brain from amyloid beta, a key protein associated with Alzheimer’s.

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A “Turbo Charge” for Your Brain?

CAS prof’s research could lead to tools to enhance brain function, treat disorders. Robert Reinhart calls the medial frontal cortex the “alarm bell of the brain.” “If you make an error, this brain area fires,” says Reinhart, a College of Arts & Sciences assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences.

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The Dimensional Systems Model

The Dimensional Systems Model explains higher cortical functions on the basis of cortical columns that serve as the basic information unit. Although the original theory was developed in 1984, it was considered too speculative and untestable by peer reviewers. However,...

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Concussions May Affect Women Differently Than Men

Do concussions affect women differently than men? What impact do they have on a person’s psychological health? Rutgers researchers are at the forefront of examining concussions’ effect on female athletes and how psychological health impacts recovery time.

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Researchers uncover the source of diabetic pain

A new King’s College London study reveals the molecular basis of chronic nerve pain in diabetes. The findings in mice, published today in Science Translational Medicine, could one day lead to treatments which target the source of the pain.

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Two minds: The cognitive differences between men and women

When Nirao Shah decided in 1998 to study sex-based differences in the brain using up-to-the-minute molecular tools, he didn’t have a ton of competition. But he did have a good reason. “I wanted to find and explore neural circuits that regulate specific behaviors,” says Shah, then a newly minted Caltech PhD who was beginning a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia.

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Beer can lift your spirits

The food ingredient hordenine activates the reward centre in the brain. Visitors to the Oktoberfest have always known it and now it has been scientifically proven – beer can lift your spirits.

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Concussion: How the NFL came to shape the issue that plagued it

Concussion has dogged the NFL since the 1990s, and its initial response––avoidance and superficial gestures to mollify critics––damaged its public image. However, in recent years, the league has repositioned itself as a leader in concussion prevention and research, a new University of Michigan study shows.

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Child abuse affects brain wiring

Impaired neural connections may explain profound and long-lasting effects of traumatic experiences during childhood. For the first time, researchers have been able to see changes in the neural structures in specific areas of the brains of people who suffered severe abuse as children.

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Study uncovers markers for severe form of multiple sclerosis

Scientists have uncovered two closely related cytokines — molecules involved in cell communication and movement — that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the most severe form of the disease. The findings, authored by researchers at Yale University, Oregon Health & Science University, and the University of California point the way toward developing a novel treatment to prevent progressive forms of the disease.

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Analyzing the language of color

Cognitive scientists find that people can more easily communicate warmer colors than cool ones. The human eye can perceive millions of different colors, but the number of categories human languages use to group those colors is much smaller. Some languages use as few as three color categories (words corresponding to black, white, and red), while the languages of industrialized cultures use up to 10 or 12 categories.

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Gamers have an advantage in learning

Video games are apparently better than their reputation.
Neuropsychologists of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum let video gamers compete against non-gamers in a learning competition. During the test, the video gamers performed significantly better and showed an increased brain activity in the brain areas that are relevant for learning.

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Learning and unlearning to fear: The two faces of noradrenaline

Emotional learning can create strong memories and powerful emotional responses, but flexible behavior demands that these responses be inhibited when they are no longer appropriate. Scientists at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered that emotional and flexible learning rely on an important division of labor in the brain.

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Why bad sleep doesn’t always lead to depression

Brain’s reward center activity may protect against negative mental health effects. Poor sleep is both a risk factor, and a common symptom, of depression. But not everyone who tosses and turns at night becomes depressed. Individuals whose brains are more attuned to rewards may be protected from the negative mental health effects of poor sleep, says a new study by Duke University neuroscientists.

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Immune system linked to alcohol drinking behaviour

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have found a new link between the brain’s immune system and the desire to drink alcohol in the evening. In laboratory studies using mice, researchers have been able to switch off the impulse to drink alcohol by giving mice a drug that blocks a specific response from the immune system in the brain.

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New model may help overcome the brain’s fortress-like barrier

Scientists have helped provide a way to better understand how to enable drugs to enter the brain and how cancer cells make it past the blood brain barrier. The brain is protected by the near-impermeable blood brain barrier, a fortress which protects the brain but which also prevents the treatment of brain diseases, including brain tumours.

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Researchers find the key to loss of smell with Parkinson’s disease

University of Auckland research has found an anatomical link for the loss of the sense of smell in Parkinson’s disease. The research, published in the journal Brain, is the work of academics Associate Professor Maurice Curtis, Dr Victor Dieriks, Dr Sheryl Tan and Sir Richard Faull. All are part of the Centre for Brain Research at the University’s Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences.

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My Partner is Depressed, What Can I Do?

My Partner Is Depressed, What Can I Do? by Bronwyn Barter Reviewed by Gunnel Minett My Partner Is Depressed, What Can I Do? by Bronwyn Barter (2017). New York, NY: Strategic Book Publishing. 168 pp. Paperback £11.73. Available from Amazon.co.uk Just Part of Biology...

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Researchers Develop New Tool to Assess Individual’s Level of Wisdom

Researchers at University of San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new tool called the San Diego Wisdom Scale (SD-WISE) to assess an individual’s level of wisdom, based upon a conceptualization of wisdom as a trait with a neurobiological as well as psychosocial basis. San Diego Wisdom Scale reflects data that neurobiology underlies trait.

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Guess who? Facial expressions can cause confusion

Photos of the same person can look substantially different. For example, your passport photo may look quite different from your driving licence, or your face in holiday photos. In fact, these differences can mean you look like a different person from one photo to the next, to those that don’t know you.

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Neuroendocrine reflex triggers infections

Working with colleagues from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Harvard Medical School and Ohio State University, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that the increased incidence of infections seen in spinal cord injury patients is directly linked to a disruption of the normal central nervous system.

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Study Suggests Link between Youth Football and Later-Life Emotional, Behavioral and Cognitive Impairments

A new study has found an association between participation in youth tackle football before age 12 and impaired mood and behavior later in life. The study appears in Nature’s Translational Psychiatry. The study showed that participation in youth football before age 12 increased the risk of problems with behavioral regulation, apathy and executive functioning by two-fold and increased the risk of clinically elevated depression scores by three-fold.

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Faulty cell signaling derails cerebral cortex development, could it lead to autism?

UNC School of Medicine researchers pinpoint signaling problems in the progenitor cells crucial for proper neuron generation and organization. They have shown how the deletion of the protein APC in progenitor cells leads to massive disruption of brain development and the canonical Wnt protein pathway – a signaling cascade– that previously was linked to genes associated with autism.

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Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes

NIH-funded preclinical rodent study points to neutrophils for potential treatment options. While immune cells called neutrophils are known to act as infantry in the body’s war on germs, a National Institutes of Health-funded study suggests they can act as medics as well.

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Oxytocin Turns Up the Volume of Your Social Environment

efore you shop for the “cuddle” hormone oxytocin to relieve stress and enhance your social life, read this: A new study from the University of California, Davis, suggests that sometimes, blocking the action of oxytocin in the brain may be a better option. The results are published online in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

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