The Neuropsychotherapist Complete Archive

Magazine

Neuroscience and Counselling

Members Download Article: The Remarkable and Mysterious Brain On a cold and wet winter morning, Bob overcomes his “excuses” and begins his daily run. As expected, the first few kilometres are gruelling and painful, but midway through the run,...

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Understanding PANS & PANDAS

Members Download Article: Insomnia, out-of-control tantrums, separation anxiety, rage, obsessions, disordered eating, paranoia, motor and vocal tics. As a therapist or parent, have you come across a child exhibiting any of these behaviours and...

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The New Mind-Body Science of Depression

Members Download Article: Charles Raison, MD, is the Mary Sue and Mike Shannon Chair for Healthy Minds, Children & Families and Professor in the School of Human Ecology and the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of...

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Prepared, Ready and Able

Members Download Article: You come home from a long day of work and as you wander past the kitchen you see the refrigerator and the next thing you know, you have opened the fridge door and you are extracting a selection of tasty treats. How did...

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Hilary Jacobs Hendel

Download Article: This month we put the spotlight on licensed clinical social worker and adult psychoanalyst, Hilary Jacobs Hendel. She has a Master of Social Work with Clinical Concentration from Fordham University and has completed the 4-year...

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What is PANDAS/PANS?

Members Download full article  When my middle son, Sammy, was twelve years old he was suddenly struck with an increasingly bizarre series of behaviors, just before the start of sixth grade. He was diagnosed first with obsessive-compulsive...

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October Issue Correction

Our apologies to Paul Potgieter and Thedy Veliz - in our recent October issue we put Thedy's bio in with Paul's outline of his presentation for the upcoming neuropsychotherapy conference. Our deepest apologies for the mix up. Here attached is the corrected pages, and...

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The Neurobiology of Feeling Safe

Members Download: THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS: REFLECTIONS OF THE BRAIN AND BODY The important role of “safety” in our life is so intuitive and so relevant that it is surprising that our institutions neglect it. Perhaps our misunderstanding of the role...

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Evolutionary Perspectives

Evolutionary Perspectives: Attachment Theory, Affect Regulation Theory and Working With Relational Trauma Haley Peckham Subscribers Download The Full Article Here  A famous quote from Anaïs Nin asserts that “We don’t see things as they are, we see...

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Eating for Mental Wellbeing

Report by Binh Nguyen Members Download How often have we heard the saying that we are what we eat, with the view that the foods we eat can directly influence our state of mind and physical health? This statement may well be true for the more...

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The Story of You

Members Download There is so much I want to say and share about the importance of having a coherent narrative, and how one achieves that. Sometimes I think its simpler and clearer to talk about it in educational rather than psychological terms…in...

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Maria Kostyanaya

Download article aria Kostyanaya is a provisionally registered psychologist currently working for Queensland Corrective Services in Brisbane and at the Queensland Psychology Clinic in...

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A Brief Review of the Best Apps

Members Download:  martphone technology has been increasingly used in the medical field and is currently rising in the field of behavioral health. Some behavioral health interventions...

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The Art of the Brain

Members Download:  y nontraditional path to art through a doctorate in neuroscience arms me with an outsider’s perspective and gives me the freedom to introduce imagery and concepts...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 6

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 6 (June 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As the psalmist once said, we are “fearfully and wonderfully made”. How true that is when we consider the immense complexity of the brain—and...

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Ken Benau

Download Article: Ken Benau, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with 27 years’ experience. He has a private practice in psychotherapy, consultation and training in Kensington, CA, located in the San Francisco Bay area. For many years, Ken...

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Work Stressed and Play?

Work Stressed and Play? A brief look at competitive gaming Members Download the Article here: To date, competitive gaming has not been widely researched or recognised in the scientific and professional literature on video games. As the name...

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The Neuroscience of War

Download Article: As the Middle East rages with war and terrorism, one can only be awed by the magnitude of the conflict,  the degree of the calamity that is taking place there, and its effect on the children. Millions of children in the region...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Issue 5 Volume 5

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 5 (May 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content It is no secret that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a major mental health concern today. Prevalence appears to have risen...

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Dan Siegel

Download Article Dr. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA. He is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute, an...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 4

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 4 (April 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content As therapists, we formulate hypotheses about our clients and their states of mind from a psychological perspective. We may utilise talk...

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Ann Diamond Weinstein

  Download Article: Ann Diamond Weinstein, PhD, holds a doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology. In her consultation practice she provides education and coaching to health and mental health practitioners,...

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The Neuropsychotherapist Volume 5 Issue 3

THE NEUROPSYCHOTHERAPIST Volume 5 Issue 3 (March 2017) ISSN 2201-9529   Members Download: Content Most people who suffer trauma show evidence of a remarkable human capacity to overcome traumatic events, recovering to lead a normal life with...

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Narcissism – The Shame-Negating Personality

Download Article: Narcissism: The Shame-Negating Personality Mark Zaslav, PhD Psychiatric labels have long been criticized for bringing stigma to those afflicted with mental disorders. In the case of narcissistic personality disorder, one glance...

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Departments

Cannabis linked to bipolar symptoms in young adults

Researchers from Warwick Medical School found that adolescent cannabis use is an independent risk factor for future hypomania – periods of elated mood, over-active and excited behaviour, and reduced need for sleep that are often experienced as part of bipolar disorder, and have a significant impact on day-to-day life.

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Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and neurodegeneration worldwide. A major hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of toxic plaques in the brain, formed by the abnormal aggregation of a protein called beta-amyloid inside neurons. Still...

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CLOCK Gene May Hold Answers to Human Brain Evolution

A new study provides insight on the matter by demonstrating that a gene controlling our biological clocks also plays a vital role in regulating human-specific genes important to brain evolution. The findings from the O’Donnell Brain Institute open new paths of research into how CLOCK proteins produced by the CLOCK gene affect brain function and the processes by which neurons find their proper place in the brain.

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Nutrition, Sleep & Mental Health

by Julia Rucklidge, PhD & Bonnie Kaplan, PhD The two of us have had the honour recently of co-editing a special series on Nutrition and Mental Health for the journal called Clinical Psychological Science (CPS), one of the flagship journals of the Association of...

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Some video games are good for older adults’ brains

Playing 3D-platform video games regularly may improve cognitive functions in seniors and increase grey matter in a brain structure called the hippocampus. If you’re between 55 and 75 years old, you may want to try playing 3D platform games like Super Mario 64 to stave off mild cognitive impairment and perhaps even prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

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Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity

Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois. Chemists have used such carefully crafted light beams, called coherent control, to regulate chemical reactions, but this study is the first demonstration of using them to control function in a living cell. The study used optogenetic mouse neurons – that is, cells that had a gene added to make them respond to light.

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Theory: Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence

Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. Some neuroscientists think intelligence springs from a single region or neural network. Others argue that metabolism or the efficiency with which brain cells make use...

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Chemo brain starts during cancer’s progression, not just after chemotherapy

The memory and thinking problems experienced by cancer survivors, known as “chemo brain” or “chemo fog,” are not just the result of chemotherapy treatment, they may start as tumors form and develop, suggests a Baycrest-led study. Researchers found that female mice with a form of breast cancer demonstrated impaired performance on learning and memory tests before chemotherapy drugs were administered.

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Now you like it, now you don’t

Enjoyment of music is considered a subjective experience; what one person finds gratifying, another may find irritating. Music theorists have long emphasized that although musical taste is relative, our enjoyment of music, be it classical or heavy metal, arises, among other aspects, from structural features of music, such as chord or rhythm patterns that generate anticipation and expectancy.

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Smart people have better connected brains

Differences in intelligence have so far mostly been attributed to differences in specific brain regions. However, are smart people’s brains also wired differently to those of less intelligent persons? A new study published by researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany) supports this assumption. In intelligent persons, certain brain regions are more strongly involved in the flow of information between brain regions, while other brain regions are less engaged.

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Otago study finds infection and schizophrenia symptom link

If a mother’s immune system is activated by infection during pregnancy, it could result in critical cognitive deficits linked to schizophrenia in her offspring, a University of Otago study has revealed. Lead author Dr Ryan Ward, of the Department of Psychology, says schizophrenia is thought to result from an interaction of genetic and environmental “hits.”

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MRI Shows Brain Differences Among ADHD Patients

Information from brain MRIs can help identify people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and distinguish among subtypes of the condition, according to a study appearing online in the journal Radiology. ADHD is a disorder of the brain characterized by periods of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. The disorder affects 5 to 7 percent of children and adolescents worldwide, according to the ADHD Institute.

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Starvation: What Does it Do to the Brain?

by Bonnie Kaplan, PhD & Julia Rucklidge, PhD Before we start looking at current trials using nutrients to treat mental health outcomes, we thought we would revisit the past once more to see how knowledge gained by our predecessors may be helpful for our current...

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What Can Twitter Reveal About People With ADHD? Penn Researchers Provide Answers

In a Twitter-based study, Penn researchers found that people with ADHD tended to post messages related to lack of focus, self-regulation, intention and failure, as well as expressions of mental, physical and emotional exhaustion. They often used words like those in the word cloud above more frequently than the control group and often posted during hours of the day when the majority of people sleep, from midnight to 6 a.m.

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Spanking Linked to Increase in Children’s Behavior Problems

Children who have been spanked by their parents by age 5 show an increase in behavior problems at age 6 and age 8 relative to children who have never been spanked, according to new findings. The study, which uses a statistical technique to approximate random assignment, indicates that this increase in behavior problems cannot be attributed to various characteristics of the child, the parents, or the home environment – rather, it seems to be the specific result of spanking.

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Why do some head knocks cause more damage than others?

Veteran sailors know that rogue waves can rise suddenly in mid-ocean to capsize even the largest vessels. Now it appears that a similar phenomenon called shear shock wave occurs in the concussed brain. It may help explain why some head knocks cause so much more harm than others.

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Humans don’t use as much brain power as we like to think

Animals had energy-hungry brains long before we did. For years, scientists assumed that humans devote a larger share of their daily calories to their brains than other animals. Although the human brain makes up only 2 percent of body weight, it consumes more than 25 percent of our baseline energy budget.

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Alzheimer’s disease might be a ‘whole body’ problem

Alzheimer’s disease, the leading cause of dementia, has long been assumed to originate in the brain but new research indicates that it could be triggered by breakdowns elsewhere in the body. The findings, published today in Molecular Psychiatry, offer hope that future drug therapies might be able to stop or slow the disease without acting directly on the brain, which is a complex, sensitive and often hard-to-reach target. Instead, such drugs could target the kidney or liver, ridding the blood of a toxic protein before it ever reaches the brain.

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‘Maturity’ molecule helps adolescent brain grow up

When it comes to raising teenagers, parents have an ally — laminin alpha 5, a molecule crucial to the maturing of the adolescent brain — a Yale-led study published Oct. 31 in the journal Cell Reports suggests. For a decade, the Yale team had sought answers to a fundamental question: How does the brain, marked by frantic growth of synaptic connections between cells, grow up and mature?

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Nicotine’s hold: What the gut and gender have to do with

Many people who smoke or chew tobacco can’t seem to escape nicotine’s addictive properties. Studies show that women in particular seem to have a harder time quitting, even with assistance, when compared to men. Now, scientists report in a mouse study published in ACS’ journal Chemical Research in Toxicology that the difference in gender smoking patterns and smoking’s effects could be due to how nicotine impacts the brain-gut relationship.

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Synaptic disorder

A Würzburg research team describes a hitherto unknown pathogenic mechanism of motor neuron disorders. This should lead to a rethinking in drug development. Motor neurons are the nerves that send impulses to the muscles to generate movement.

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How do adult brain circuits regulate new neuron production?

In a new study published in Cell Stem Cell, UNC School of Medicine neuroscientist Juan Song and colleagues discovered a long-distance brain circuit that controls the production of new neurons in the hippocampus. Before we are born, the developing brain creates an incredible number of neurons, which migrate to specific parts of the brain to ready us for life. Contrary to popular belief, genesis of new neurons does not stop at birth or even in childhood.

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FSU research documents link between nightmares and self-harm

New research from Florida State University finds a link between nightmares and self-injurious behavior, such as cutting or burning oneself. The findings are similar to previous research showing other sleep problems, such as nightmares, insomnia and trouble falling asleep, are linked to suicide and attempted suicide.

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Autism Treatments May Restore Brain Connections

Scientists have identified a pair of treatments that may restore brain function to autism patients who lack a gene critical to maintaining connections between neurons, according to a study from the Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Although this gene has been linked to abnormal brain size, the research in mice demonstrates the gene has no such role and instead is needed to regulate a protein capable of inhibiting the ability of neurons to communicate with each other.

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Close friends linked to a sharper memory

Maintaining positive, warm and trusting friendships might be the key to a slower decline in memory and cognitive functioning, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. SuperAgers — who are 80 years of age and older who have cognitive ability at least as good as people in their 50s or 60s — reported having more satisfying, high-quality relationships compared to their cognitively average, same-age peers, the study reports.

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Probability calculations – even babies can master it

One of the most important features of the human mind is its ability to make generalisations based on sparse data. Our brain accomplishes this task by using probability information to represent statistical regularities in our environment and guiding our actions. As adults, we have a vague understanding of which events are likely to happen. But so far, it has not been clear when in our lifespan we begin to estimate which events are more likely to occur than others. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig have now shown that even six-month-old babies have a sense of probability.

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Do Animals Think Rationally?

Researcher Suggests Rational Decision-Making Doesn’t Require Language. Previous research has shown that animals can remember specific events, use tools and solve problems. But exactly what that means – whether they are making rational decisions or simply reacting to their environment through mindless reflex – remains a matter of scientific dispute.

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Study Shows Alarming Number Of Teens Cyberbully Themselves

Adolescents harming themselves with cuts, scratches or burns has gained a lot of attention over the years not just because of the physical damage and internal turmoil, but also because it has been linked to suicide. More recently, a new form of self-harm in youth has emerged and is cause for concern, warns a researcher and bullying expert from Florida Atlantic University.

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Scientists identify mechanism that helps us inhibit unwanted thoughts

Scientists have identified a key chemical within the ‘memory’ region of the brain that allows us to suppress unwanted thoughts, helping explain why people who suffer from disorders such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia often experience persistent intrusive thoughts when these circuits go awry.

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Researchers map trends in drug development

One third of all drugs on the American market act on the same kind of important cell receptor – the G protein-coupled receptors. A major mapping of these drugs by the University of Copenhagen and Uppsala University found that their pharmacological mechanisms are becoming more complex. The mapping also reveals rapid developments especially within Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, asthma and diabetes.

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SIDS breakthrough: why babies shouldn’t sleep face down

International research involving the University of Adelaide has uncovered a developmental abnormality in babies – especially in premature babies and in boys – that for the first time has been directly linked to cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Researchers believe this abnormality, in the brain’s control of head and neck movement, breathing, heartbeat and the body’s responses to deprivation of oxygen supply, could be the reason why some babies sleeping on their front are more at risk of SIDS.

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